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Across the Country

Get Your Candidates Talking About Youth Justice

Rachel Marshall Wednesday, 20 June 2018 Posted in 2018, Across the Country

By Rachel Marshall, Federal Policy Counsel

We’re a little less than 5 months away from 2018’s crucial midterm elections, but before we can get there, states across the country are voting in packed primary elections. Here at the Campaign for Youth Justice, we’re using this opportunity to make sure local communities are getting out to vote and getting their local candidates to talk about youth justice. That’s why we were thrilled to hear Pod Save the People host DeRay McKesson talk to two out of the three candidates for Baltimore State’s Attorney on a recent episode  of the podcast ahead of Maryland’s June 26 primary election (he invited all three candidates, but the third candidate did not respond).

This Is America: Can it be the Year to #VoteYouthJustice?

Aprill O. Turner Wednesday, 16 May 2018 Posted in Across the Country

By Aprill O. Turner, Communications Director

2018 has already been another year of tension in cities across the country between police officers and young black males.

The headlines of these incidents never seem to cease. In March, officers in Sacramento, Calif., opened fired and killed Stephon Clark for standing in his own backyard holding a cellphone. Then in April, Brooklyn police officers shot and killed Saheed Vassel, an unarmed black man with mental disabilities when they mistakenly mistook the pipe he was holding for a gun.

National Youth Violence Prevention Week: Putting our Children and Communities First

Harmeet Kamboj Monday, 19 March 2018 Posted in 2018, Across the Country

By Harmeet Kamboj, Communications Associate

This week marks National Youth Violence Prevention Week, an initiative spearheaded by Students Against Violence Everywhere (SAVE) and Sandy Hook Promise to "raise awareness and to educate students, teachers, school administrators, counselors, school resource officers, parents, and the public on effective ways to prevent or reduce youth violence." In light of the recent Parkland, Florida school shooting and resulting policy talks addressing school safety, CFYJ hopes this year's Youth Violence Prevention Week sparks a conversation that not only forefronts the safety of our youth and communities, but also underscores the need for school- and community-based support services that benefit our children in the long term.

The Importance of Women’s Engagement in Our Political Process

Gianna Nitti Wednesday, 07 March 2018 Posted in 2018, Across the Country

By Gianna Nitti, Public Interest Communications and State Campaigns Fellow

March celebrates International Women’s Day, a time where we collectively take a look around the world and throughout history to recognize the groundbreaking social, economic, cultural and political contributions of women to our country and the world. Ahead of the 2018 midterm elections, CFYJ is looking at where and how women in our country are serving in elected office, especially in positions that can benefit youth justice, as well as potential for increased engagement in this regard.

Don’t Arm Teachers; Arm Communities with Prevention Supports

Rachel Marshall Monday, 05 March 2018 Posted in 2018, Across the Country

By Rachell Marshall, Federal Policy Counsel

One week after a gunman took the lives of 17 students and teachers at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School (MSD) in Parkland, Florida, students across the country stood in solidarity with students from MSD and walked out of their classes to demand action on gun control.

MD Legislators are Being Asked to Vote to Condemn More Children to Adult Prison, When Real Focus Should Be on Police Officers to Reduce Crime

Brian Evans Friday, 09 February 2018 Posted in 2018, Across the Country

By Brian Evans, State Campaigns Director
 
Right now the Maryland General Assembly is considering draconian, reactionary, “tough on crime” legislation that reads as if it were dictated to them by Attorney General Jeff Sessions himself. The bills (HB100-102, SB197-199) contain all the failed criminal justice policies of the 1980s and 1990s – mandatory minimums, consecutive sentences to ensure longer prison terms, automatically charging children as adults, and absurdly vague language about “gangs.”
 

Embracing the Rights of the Child: The US must Prioritize and Ratify

Wednesday, 20 December 2017 Posted in 2017, Across the Country

On December 10, 1948, in San Francisco, in the aftermath of the most brutal war the world had ever seen, a group of delegates gathered to sign the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a simple 30-article document outlining the basic rights to which all humanity is entitled and which all governments should respect, protect, and fulfill. Over the years, the principles of this Declaration have been fleshed out by more detailed treaties called Conventions. No Convention has more universal endorsement (at least on paper) than the Convention of the Rights of the Child (CRC), ratified by every country in the world – except the United States.

Study Details Benefits to Missouri of “Raise the Age”

By Brian Evans Wednesday, 20 December 2017 Posted in 2017, Across the Country

By Brian Evans, State Campaigns Director

Over the past two years, four states have “Raised the Age” of criminal court jurisdiction to 18 – Louisiana and South Carolina in 2016, and New York and North Carolina earlier this year. While these recently passed laws have yet to go into effect, there are only five states that still charge all 17 year olds as adults no matter how minor the offense. Missouri, which has had a reputation for being a leader in juvenile justice because of its “Missouri model” of youth detention facilities, is one of those five states.

Northern Ireland: A Human Rights Approach to Youth Crime

By Rachel Marshall Wednesday, 20 December 2017 Posted in 2017, Across the Country

By Rachel Marshall, Federal Policy Counsel

In 1998, the Good Friday Agreement brought an end to three decades of conflict in Northern Ireland known as “The Troubles.” Even after the peace process, many in Northern Ireland harbored a deep distrust in police and the larger justice system. As part of the healing process, the government realized a complete overhaul of the justice system was needed. From this realization emerged a focus on restorative justice. In 2002, the Northern Ireland Justice Act created a statutory scheme for juvenile justice establishing a restorative justice model as the primary mode of intervention for justice-involved youth. While the model was initially established for 10-16 year olds, in 2005 the statute was expanded to include 17 year olds. Restorative justice is used both in pre-sentence diversion, as well as court-based intervention, with most low-level offenses dismissed with only a “caution.”

Vote Locally

Brian Evans Monday, 06 November 2017 Posted in 2017, Across the Country

By Brian Evans, State Campaigns Director

It is said that all politics is local. It’s also true that all – or at least most – criminal justice is local, and that’s especially the case when it comes to youth involved in the justice system. So while Presidential election years and even-numbered years when members of the U.S. Congress are up for re-election may draw the most attention, off years like this one should not be ignored.

This November 7, mayors, city and county government officials, judges, and local prosecutors, are up for election across the country, and the winners and losers of these races will have a profound impact on local criminal justice policies and practices.

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